Short Intervals

Perhaps you’ve been running for a while and you are feeling that OK you can cover quite a few miles each time you go out and you’ve been getting faster too. Now, though, most sessions are a chore and you’ve stopped getting faster and often you are a lot slower than you have been.

Let’s think about this for a moment. When you started running it was quite exciting because you had your small goals which entailed running further in distance or longer in time. It was great – there was build up, build up almost every time. Then you realised you were also getting faster each week.

What you need now is a little bit of interest to take away the feeling of staleness. Also you want to find a way of getting a little faster.

Well now is the time to include speed work – or what I tend to refer to as “efforts”.

We are going to have a look at Short Intervals to give you a pick-me-up. These is one of the simplest speed sessions that you can do.

Challenge

Short Intervals once a week for six weeks

Before starting on the efforts it is essential that you do a warm up run plus stretches and drills.

When you have finished the efforts you must again have a slow jog to cool down.

First some explanation of the terms and phrases used:
Fast Pace = not flat out but making an effort that means you push yourself much faster than when out for a steady run
Recovery Jog = in this case a slow enough run which means that you will be ready to start another effort.

On the athletic track:

Run at a fast pace for 100 metres. Recovery jog for 100 metres. Do this four times.

Then have a couple of minutes rest before doing it all over again.

On the road:

Best place is a fairly flat road with smooth, even pavement and street lights.

Run at a fast pace from one lamppost to the next. Recovery jog from one lamppost to the next. Do this four times.

Then have a couple of minutes rest before doing it all over again.

Off road or country lane

Only undertake in daylight so that you can see uneven ground. Mark out a fairly straight, even length measuring approximately 100 metres.

Run at a fast pace from end to end of measured length. Recovery jog back along this length of ground. Do this four times.

Then have a couple of minutes rest before doing it all over again.

Keep a record

First include the challenge in your scheduled runs – in diary or on calendar

Second write each session up in your log book.

Third submit your results to Runners’ Hub HERE 

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